Derwent Water

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Derwentwater, or Derwent Water, is one of the principal bodies of water in the Lake District National Park in north west England. It lies wholly within the Borough of Allerdale, in the county of Cumbria. The lake occupies part of Borrowdale and lies immediately south of the town of Keswick. It is both fed and drained by the River Derwent. It measures approximately three miles (five kilometres) long by 1 mile (1.5 kilometres) wide and is some 72 feet (22 metres) deep. There are several islands within the lake, one of which is inhabited. I took this first photo just after 6am and about 15 minutes after sunrise, which allowed the sun to rise above the hills in the distance

Shdugra Waterfall

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Ushba waterfall (Shdugra) is the most affluent waterfall in the whole of Georgia. Located in Svaneti, near Mazera village. You can reach both the bottom of the waterfall, and the overhead of it. If you manage to reach the overhead, you will be able to see the glacier at the bottom of the Ushba, also wonderful views all over the Svaneti. I can’t find an official measurement of its height, but it is hundreds of meters high. I took this photo after a two hour drive in a 4×4 followed by a four hour hike, it’s quite remote and it was a challenge to get the drone into the ravine.

Stari Most

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Stari Most (Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian: Stari most, Serbian Cyrillic: Стари мост; lit. ’Old Bridge’), also known as Mostar Bridge (Turkish: Mostar Köprüsü), is a rebuilt 16th-century Ottoman bridge in the city of Mostar in Bosnia and Herzegovina that crosses the river Neretva and connects the two parts of the city. The Old Bridge stood for 427 years, until it was destroyed on 9 November 1993 by Croatian Defence Council during the Croat–Bosniak War. Subsequently, a project was set in motion to reconstruct it; the rebuilt bridge opened on 23 July 2004. I took this photo on a Saturday afternoon and soon realised that locals jump off it. Here is a further photo just before one just did that.

Pennard Castle

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Pennard Castle is a ruined castle, near the modern village of Pennard on the Gower Peninsula, in south Wales. The castle was built in the early 12th century as a timber ringwork following the Norman invasion of Wales. The walls were rebuilt in stone by the Braose family at the turn of the 13th and 14th centuries, including a stone gatehouse. Soon afterwards, however, encroaching sand dunes caused the site to be abandoned and it fell into ruin. Restoration work was carried out during the course of the 20th century and the remains of the castle are now protected under UK law as a Grade II* listed building.

Red Cliffs

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Sgwd yr Eira Waterfall

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Waterfall Country (or sometimes Waterfalls Country) is an English name often given to the Vale of Neath in South Wales. The tourist area around the head of valley has an unusually large number of publicly accessible waterfalls. The area is not officially defined but generally includes the group of falls on the Nedd Fechan, Pyrddin, Hepste and Mellte rivers, all of which lie between the villages of Pontneddfechan and Ystradfellte in the Brecon Beacons National Park. All of these falls lie within or on the boundary of the county of Brecknockshire, now part of the unitary authority of Powys. A few miles further west are Henrhyd Falls on the Nant Llech, a tributary of the Tawe and to the south-west are Melin Court Falls on the Melin Court Brook, a tributary of the River Neath. These, along with Aberdulais Falls on the Dulais, a further tributary of the Neath are also encompassed by the term ‘Waterfall/s Country’ by some writers. Collectively the falls are one of the more popular natural attractions in South Wales, which has caused problems of erosion in the vicinity of many of the falls. Most occupy locations designated as sites of special scientific interest or as special areas of conservation which aim to protect the biodiversity and geodiversity of these sites. The designations place a duty on the landowners and managers to protect the sites and so various erosion […]

Hooken Cliffs

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Hooken cliiffs, a dramatic landslip in 1790 left a tumbled landscape where thick vegetation is speared through by spectacular white cliffs and pinnacles, providing a haven for wildlife. Part of the south west coast path, there are spectacular views in either direction of red cliffs soaring beyond the white cliffs, linking the villages of Beer and Branscombe with tales of smugglers, Romans and lacemakers. It is also is the best location in Devon for finding fossils, in particular, echinoids, ammonites, fish and brachiopods, which are easy to find. You can find another photo on the south west coast path here.

Freshwater Bay

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Freshwater is a large village and civil parish at the western end of the Isle of Wight, England. The southern, coastal part of the village is Freshwater Bay, named for the adjacent small cove. Freshwater sits at the western end of the region known as the Back of the Wight or the West Wight, a popular tourist area. Freshwater is close to steep chalk cliffs. It was the birthplace of physicist Robert Hooke and was the home of Poet Laureate Alfred Lord Tennyson. I took this shot using the 162mm lens on my new Mavic 3, you can make out that there is a bird perched on the rock.

Old Harry Rocks

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Old Harry Rocks are three chalk formations, including a stack and a stump, located at Handfast Point, on the Isle of Purbeck in Dorset, southern England. They mark the most eastern point of the Jurassic Coast, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Old Harry Rocks lies directly east of Studland, about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) northeast of Swanage, and about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of the large towns of Poole and Bournemouth. To the south are the chalk cliffs of Ballard Down, much of which is owned by the National Trust. The rocks can be viewed from the Dorset section of the South West Coast Path. When I took this photo is was incredibly windy and the drone was really struggling, but fortunately the photo still managed to stitch. You can see another photo of the south west coast path here.

Cheddar Gorge

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Cheddar Gorge is a limestone gorge in the Mendip Hills, near the village of Cheddar, Somerset, England. The gorge is the site of the Cheddar show caves, where Britain’s oldest complete human skeleton, Cheddar Man, estimated to be 9,000 years old, was found in 1903. Older remains from the Upper Late Palaeolithic era (12,000–13,000 years ago) have been found. The caves, produced by the activity of an underground river, contain stalactites and stalagmites. The gorge is part of a Site of Special Scientific Interest called Cheddar Complex. Cheddar Gorge, including the caves and other attractions, has become a tourist destination. In a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers, following its appearance on the television programme Seven Natural Wonders (2005), Cheddar Gorge was named as the second greatest natural wonder in Britain, surpassed only by Dan yr Ogof caves. The gorge attracts about 500,000 visitors per year. I shot this from just below the top of the castle rock between showers.